Conferences

Children & War: Past and Present II, University of Salzburg (Austria), 13-15 July 2016

Presented “Beyond the “Biological Future of the Nation”: The Evacuation of French and Belgian Children to Switzerland, 1940-1945” which examined the value of children according to humanitarian organisations and governments in the early 20th century. The French/Belgian child evacuations to Switzerland was exemplified as an unusual and unpredictable reaction to an otherwise larger trend among western nations which sought to protect children as not only the biologically important key to founding the future nation, but as crucial to the redemption of national identity in the chaos of the immediate post-war era.

Pour une Histoire des Droits des Enfants au XXe Siècle: Approaches Transnationales, University of Angers (France), 9-10 October 2014

“Self-Motivated Humanitarianism?: The Study of the Evacuation of Belgian and French Children to Switzerland, 1941-1945” closely analysed the reasons behind the Swiss, Germans and Allies participation in the child evacuations to Switzerland. This paper argued that although these governments grappled with how to save children from the atrocities of war, the motivations for doing so were, paradoxically, not humanitarian.

Modern British History Network, University of St. Andrews (Scotland), 10-11 June 2014

“The Limitations of Collaboration: A Study of the Evacuation Scheme of Belgian and French Children, 1942-1945” provided a snapshot into the challenges experienced during the French/Belgian child evacuations to Switzerland, and how the lack of diplomacy between participating nations negatively affected operations.

Children & War: Past and Present I, University of Salzburg (Austria), 10-12 July 2013

“The Plight of Belgian Children: A Study of the Motivations Behind the Allied Evacuation Scheme, 1942-1945” focused upon the devastating and desperate conditions of wartime Belgium to argue that Belgian children actually suffered the most of all countries in Western Europe in 1941, which sparked Allied humanitarian interest in a large child evacuation.

Canadian Communication Association Annual Conference, Carleton University (Canada), 28-30 May 2009

“The Rhetoric of War in the Battle of Britain” reiterated some of the key findings of my masters thesis, drawing attention to the differences in rhetorical styles between Hitler and Churchill, and how their rhetoric contributed to the Battle of Britain’s unfolding.

INVITED PRESENTATIONS

Postgraduate Work in Progress Seminar, University of Edinburgh (Scotland), 26 October 2015

“’My original contribution to knowledge is…’: The Analytical Power of Summarizing Your Thesis in One Sentence” brought attention to the benefit of simply stating one’s research in a single sentence. Not only does this offer a crisp and brief summary to others, but it’s an invaluable analytical tool for the researcher themselves.

History Postgraduate Seminar, University of Edinburgh (Scotland), 17 February 2014

“Enemies in Agreement: A Study of the Allied Evacuation of Belgian and French children to Switzerland, 1942-1945” offered an overview of my research to date, highlighting the diplomatic challenges faced by the participating governments and organisations who supported the evacuations.

Centre for the Study of Modern Conflict Speaker Series, University of Edinburgh (Scotland), 6 February 2014

“Enemies in Agreement: A Study of the Allied Evacuation of Belgian and French children to Switzerland, 1942-1945” introduced my doctoral research to a lay audience, which was a refreshing and successful exercise.

Speaker Series, The Military Museums, Calgary (Canada), 12 February 2009

“The Rhetoric of War” was a public lecture given to military enthusiasts of the local community and delved into the role of speeches within modern warfare by drawing on examples from my own original research of the Battle of Britain.

ORGANISED CONFERENCES

Speaking When They’re Spoken To: Re-integrating the experiences and perspectives of children into historical research, University of Edinburgh (Scotland), 6 June 2017

Co-organised international workshop for early career researchers and doctoral students from Canada, US and the UK regarding the methodologies and agency of children in historical research; Responsible for budget proposal and submission; Organised catering and post-workshop events; Awarded funding from the Economic and Social History Research (ESHR) Group at the University of Edinburgh.

Association for the Study of Modern Italy (ASMI) Summer School 2014, University of Edinburgh (Scotland), 19-20 June 2014

Co-organised international conference for nearly 50 postgrads to showcase their latest research to peers and specially-selected professors over two days; Chaired 3 panels on Italian history, ensuring continuous discussion and efficient time-keeping.